Posts from the Yarnologue

Finished: Asparagus Shawl

First my Charm Mitts, then my Billy Sweater, and now my Asparagus Shawl.

I’m the Queen of Finished Projects lately!

This apple tree is getting a lot of work as my model lately.

This apple tree is getting a lot of work as my model lately.

The pattern is in the book “The Garden Delight Collection” by Elsebeth Lavold. Add Asparagus to your Ravelry queue.

I used Silky Wool yarn in color #105-Icy Blue. Silky Wool is a 45% Wool, 35% Silk, 20% Nylon blend available in a wide range of colors, including six new ones.

The Asparagus shawl is designated an “intermediate” pattern in the book. I thought it was good TV knitting. You have to pay attention on the edges where the asparagus tip motif is located, but the body of the shawl is garter stitch.

It's a good size for keeping warm.

It’s a good size for keeping warm.

The garter stitch combined with the Silky Wool yarn makes a soft, squishy fabric that is very cuddly. I can see this shawl being very useful for covering my shoulders when it’s cold, or even scrunching up as a make shift pillow for a nap.

Why, yes, I did use a DPN as a shawl pin.

Why, yes, I did use a DPN as a shawl pin.

There are two versions shown in the book. The three skein version I made and a larger five skein version (shown below).

Photo by Anders Rydell Asparagus shawl, 5 skein version

Photo by Anders Rydell
Asparagus shawl, 5 skein version

Something I was delighted to discover when I read through the pattern is that this isn’t a standard triangular shawl. It has neck shaping! You work a number of repeats for the back portion,  bind off stitches in the center, then work each front wing.

You can see the start of the two front wings.

You can see the start of the two front wings.

I actually worked the two fronts at the same time on a long circular needle. That way when I was done I just had to weave in the ends and go.

When I was weaving in ends I found it helpful to stretch the area I was working on over my knee so I could better trace the path of the yarn through the garter stitch.

More Silky Wool Shawls

Asparagus is not the first shawl Elsebeth has designed using Silky Wool.

Lyn Shawl and purse from Take 5. Photo by Anders Rydell

Lyn Shawl and purse from Take 5.
Photo by Anders Rydell

The Lyn Shawl from The Take Five Collection has a wonderful dragon motif. It would be a unique garment to wear.

Frida Shawl Photo by Anders Rydell

Frida Shawl
Photo by Anders Rydell

Frida from The Small Things Matters Collection interprets some of Elsebeth’s wonderful cables into a lace pattern. This pattern is fully charted and includes an image of what the finished shawl will look like to help you orient yourself.

Small Lyon shawl Photo by Anders Rydell

Small Lyon shawl
Photo by Anders Rydell

The City(e)scapes Collection shows both small and large versions of the Lyon Shawl. The smaller size shown above takes three hanks of Silky Wool.

Large Lyon shawl Photo by Anders Rydell

Large Lyon shawl
Photo by Anders Rydell

This larger version of Lyon uses seven hanks of Silky Wool.

Dinah shawl Photo by Anders Rydell

Dinah shawl
Photo by Anders Rydell

Last, but not least, is the Dinah Shawl from The Lazy Days Collection. This crescent shawl takes just three hanks of Silky Wool. I find the simple design enchanting.

What design elements do you look for in a shawl? Do you like a large one you can wrap up in or do you prefer a smaller one to just cover your shoulders? Leave a comment letting me know which of the ones shown is your favorite.

You can find local and online stores that stock the Elsbeth Lavold line of yarns and pattern by using the “find a store” feature on our main website.

 


Posted in: Elsebeth Lavold Shawl

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