Posts from the Yarnologue

Book Review: Lace One-Skein Wonders

Are you familiar with the 101 One-Skein Wonders series from Storey Publishing?

The name is sort of self-explanatory, but they are a series of knitting (and crocheting!) book focused on what you can make with that one luscious skein of yarn you couldn’t resist buying. Or perhaps it was the spare ball you bought for a larger project to ensure you didn’t run out.

We all seem to have those solo skeins in our stashes that we bought because of the beautiful color or as a souvenir on vacation.

Lace One-Skein Wonders from Storey Publishing

Lace One-Skein Wonders from Storey Publishing

The newest book in the series, which became available at the beginning of September, is “Lace One-Skein Wonders: 101 Projects Celebrating the Possibilities of Lace“.

All the patterns are by independent designers, many of whom with which you might already be familiar. The projects range from clothes and accessories to home decor. Most of the patterns are for knitting, but there are three crochet patterns as well.

The initial reviews on Amazon are all positive, but one person was confused that the book wasn’t restricted to lace-weight yarns. The “lace” in the title is from the style of knitting. The yarns range from lace weight on up, which makes it both more usable and more approachable in my opinion. Lace motifs can look good in a variety of yarn weights.

Trellis Mitts

I am pleased as punch that my Trellis Mitts pattern is included in the book.

Photos (c) by Geneve Hoffmann, from Lace One-Skein Wonders, used with permission from Storey Publishing.

Photos (c) by Geneve Hoffmann, from Lace One-Skein Wonders, used with permission from Storey Publishing.

These fingerless mitts are knit using the fingering weight yarn of Ella Rae Lace Merino. This wonderful, 100% Superwash Merino Wool yarn is available in 72 colors ranging from semi-solid to variegated.

I used green to match the leaf motif, but you can mix it up with a different color! That is one of the fun parts of knitting.

The skill level would be at least an intermediate knitter, if not experienced. The mitts are worked from the fingers down to the cuff, which I feel makes the length easier to modify. However, some people find the unusual construction challenging.

That's my picture of my finished mitt!

That’s my picture of my finished mitt!

Both hems feature the smocking stitch, which I love because it is so visually interesting. You’ll want to make sure not to pull the yarn too tightly when wrapping your stitches otherwise you’ll loose elasticity. You’ll have to add stitches in groups of 4 if you are worried the smocked section will be too snug.

The pattern includes both text and a chart for the lace.

I was really pleased with this pair of mitts when I finished them (obviously, since I took the chance of submitting them to the book!) and I missed them when they were away being judged and photographed. I’m happy they are home!

Noro Cowl

Another pattern in the book uses a yarn Knitting Fever distributes.

Photos (c) by Geneve Hoffmann, from Lace One-Skein Wonders, used with permission from Storey Publishing.

Photos (c) by Geneve Hoffmann, from Lace One-Skein Wonders, used with permission from Storey Publishing.

This lovely cowl was designed by Katherine Vaughan. You might recognize her name if you have the hardcover “Knit Noro Accessories” book, which includes her Riverbed Hat. Her patterns have also appeared in a variety of magazines.

The cowl in the book calls for Noro Chirimen yarn, a DK weight cotton, silk, and wool blend. That yarn might be hard to find, although some stores could still have it in stock.

For substitutes, I would suggest Noro Shiro yarn. This delightful, wool/cashmere/silk blend has the same yardage and a similar gauge to Chirimen.

Noro Ayatori is another option. This wool/silk blend has a little more yardage and a suggested gauge of 5 sts/inch rather than 5.5 sts/inch. But you can probably make it work.

Finally, the popular Silk Garden Lite, a silk/mohair/lambswool blend, has the same yardage and a suggested gauge of 5.5 sts/inch.

Of course, there is nothing stopping you from making a cowl in each of those Noro yarns!

Do you have any of the other One-Skein Wonders book? How often do you find yourself wishing for a one ball pattern?



One thought on “Book Review: Lace One-Skein Wonders

  1. sugababe says:

    This is one if the best books. So many patterns are interesting. The short rows are fabulous designs as well as just the way the colorations of the yarn are to make a beautiful sweater. I am making the kimona sleeve sweater which should have instructed the person making it to use bobbins, I think.

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